greenstone
The Texas group (otherwise known as Red River Region for some reason) had their annual retreat last week.  Despite the hail and tornados we had a blast!


-Brian
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DB9 Volante Driver
Were you not concerned about Jade Helm 15?
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David Lewington
Happy to publish an article and photos in AM Quarterly if you want to submit something.
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John Purser
BrianGreenstone wrote:

The Texas group (otherwise known as Red River Region for some reason)
-Brian

I think John Lavendoski created the name around 2007. I'm not sure if there is a Red River.
That was the name of a John Wayne film set in Texas.
Possibly from that.
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greenstone
David Lewington wrote:

Happy to publish an article and photos in AM Quarterly if you want to submit something.


Yes, definitely!  What do you need, and where should I send it?

Here's a link to all of the photos:  http://bgreenstone.smugmug.com/AMOC/Granbury-2015/n-xfW6kt/

As for the "Red River" name - John told me that the Section West guys made him name it that even tho it's pretty much a Texas group since any other state is just too far away to be practical.  Fact is, nobody knows what or where the Red River is.  I think it does exist, but it's a really bizarre name for them to have come up with.  Our website is just amoctexas.org, however.

Thanks,

-Brian
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John Purser
The Red River rises near the edge of the northwestern dip slope of the Llano Estacado mesa[5] in two forks in northern Texas and southwestern Oklahoma. The southern and largest fork, which is about 120 miles (190 km) long, is generally called the Prairie Dog Town Fork. It is formed in Randall County, Texas, near the county seat of Canyon, by the confluence of intermittent Palo Duro Creek and Tierra Blanca Creek. (The names mean "Hard Wood" and "White Land", respectively, in Spanish.)

State Highway No. 78 Bridge at the Red River between Oklahoma and Texas, photographed on the Oklahoma side

Crossing the Red River at the Texas-Oklahoma border from I-35

The Red River took a new channel near Natchitoches, Louisiana, and left behind Cane River Lake.
The Red River turns and flows southeast through Palo Duro Canyon in Palo Duro Canyon State Park at an elevation of 3,440 feet (1,050 m),[4] then past Newlin, Texas, to meet the Oklahoma state line. Past that point, it is generally considered the main stem of the Red River. Near Elmer, Oklahoma, the North Fork finally joins, and the river proceeds to follow a winding course east through one of the most arid parts of the Great Plains, receiving the Wichita River as it passes the city of Wichita Falls. Near Denison, the river exits the eastern end of Lake Texoma, a reservoir formed by the Denison Dam. The lake is also fed by the Washita River from the north.

Point bars, abandoned meander loops, oxbow lakes in Lafayette and Miller counties, Arkansas
After the river flows out of the southeastern end of the lake, it runs generally east towards Arkansas and receives Muddy Boggy Creek before turning southward near Texarkana.

Soon after, the river crosses south into Louisiana. The sister cities of Shreveport and Bossier City were developed on either bank of the river, as did the downriver cities of Alexandria and Pineville; the river later broadens into a complex network of marshlands surrounding the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, where it is joined by the Ouachita River, its largest tributary. Its waters eventually discharge into the Atchafalaya River[6] and flow eastward or southward into the Gulf of Mexico.

Tributaries[edit]
Tributaries include the Prairie Dog Town Fork Red River, Salt Fork Red River, North Fork Red River, Pease River, Washita River, Ouachita River, Kiamichi River, Little Wichita River, Little River, Sulphur River, and Loggy Bayou (through Lake Bistineau and Dorcheat Bayou).

Wikipedia !
I think Nick Candee dreamed up the name - anyway, Brian, like pilchards, it's a talking point. That was a great gathering you has - shame about the weather. Will look forward to a future edition of AMQ
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David Lewington
BrianGreenstone wrote:

Yes, definitely!  What do you need, and where should I send it?


I've sent you a PM
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luct
Great pic Brian!

BTW, please send some of that rain to California, where they REALLY need it! 

Cheers,

Luc
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